CALL FOR ENTRIES – Viral: Photography in the Age of Social Media

Viral-logo-testIn our age of emerging infectious diseases and “epidemic” information sharing, becoming viral has come to be seen as an indispensable part of 21st century social life.

From Ebola to social media, internet memes, and online videos, what “goes viral” has come to underscore the potentials and dangers of our interconnected world.

Both vital and lethal, things viral are the subject of the new collaboration between United Photo Industries and the Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences, and Humanities (CRASSH) at Cambridge University.

Shared, tweeted, liked, appropriated, manipulated: photography and short-form videos have become the undisputed visual language of our generation, a powerful communication tool at a time of shortening attention spans and simmering visual saturation. No longer able to imagine (or care to remember) a time unmediated by the social/digital experience, we have willingly surrendered our understanding of the world to the filtered collective-consciousness of the feed. In the words of conceptual artist Joan Foncuberta, “Images don’t represent the world any longer – images compose the world”.

Photographers and visual artists are invited to submit photographic images and short videos reflecting, questioning, and expanding on the notion of “viral” and its impact on everyday life and our understanding of the world.

 

 

The juried exhibition Viral: Photography in the Age of Social Media will be hosted at the Alison Richard Building at Cambridge University.

An opening reception and academic colloquium to mark the launch of the exhibition will take place on January 29, 2015.

Submission Deadline: January 5, 2015
Submission Fee: $30 per 8 images OR 3 short videos (not to exceed 4 minutes in length)

Juried by:

Convened by: Dr Christos Lynteris (Mellon/Newton Research Fellow, CRASSH)

For more visit their website at http://www.unitedphotoindustries.com/projects/2014/viral-photography-age-social-media/.

Lens Culture award entries due soon – Monday, December 22, 2014!

From their website:

6th annual global call for photography

$10,000 IN AWARDS • EXHIBITION IN LONDON • WORLDWIDE PROJECTIONS • INTERNATIONAL EXPOSURE

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The LensCulture Exposure Awards 2014 is an international competition that aims to discover and showcase the best photographers from all over the world. Share your images with the world for a chance at over $10,000 in awards, as well as a world-class exhibition in London and massive exposure to our global audience of over 900,000. Our international jury of notable industry professionals will select six top winners in two categories and 25 finalists. These are our largest international awards of the year and YOU are invited to submit your best photographs and get worldwide recognition.

Deadline: Monday, December 22, 2014

For more information and how to enter, check out https://www.lensculture.com/exposure-awards-2014.

Maryland Art Place is Seeking Spring 2015 Interns

Maryland Art Place is Seeking Spring 2015 Interns
Deadline January 5. 2015

Interns are responsible for assisting MAP in a variety of ways, ranging from programming to administration, with opportunities for special projects depending on skills and professional interest. Intern duties include: performing research; assisting with gallery preparation and installation; coordinating events, social media, and community outreach. Interested applicants should email a cover letter briefly outlining their interest in the position and their educational and professional goals, along with a resume to Robbin at robbin@mdartplace.org. Please send credentials by January 5, 2015.

http://mdartplace.org

Check out this Article from the Literate Lens: Magnum and the Dying Art of Darkroom

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Taken from the Article:

A few years ago, I had the pleasure of spending some time with Pablo Inirio, master darkroom printer at  Magnum Photos in New York. I was thinking about that interview recently as I heard the news of Kodak’s bankruptcy and pondered the precarious status of “old media” like books, film and silver gelatin prints. …

To read the entire article, click here: http://wp.me/p25Qfq-4D.

Drones and Film/Photography Demo at 2pm on Monday, December 8th at Cohen Plaza

At 2pm out on Cohen Plaza, Professor Allen Moore will be showing the use of several drone systems owned by a colleague, Robert Stevenson.

Please come by and check out this interesting gear.

Learn To Read Art: A Surviving History of Printed Matter at NYU’s 80WSE Gallery, Dec. 2nd through February 14, 2015

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Learn to Read Art: A Surviving History of Printed Matter
Opening at NYU’s 80WSE Gallery

Printed Matter, a pioneer in the field of artists’ books and a nerve center for New York’s alternative arts world for four decades, is the subject of the newest exhibition and publishing project at NYU’s 80WSE gallery, launching December 2. A public opening will take place on Friday, December 12th, 6-8PM.A carefully selected amalgamation of books, records, exhibition documentation and flyers, Learn to Read Art: A Surviving History of Printed Matter charts the organizational history of the New York non-profit in relation to the history of artists’ books and important movements in contemporary art from the 70’s to the present, encompassing the alternative space movement, downtown NYC counter-cultural scenes, and artist activism.“The field of artists’ books traces the historical trajectory of contemporary art, and many pioneering conceptual artists produced books and publications in order to both reach wider audiences and to circumvent the market and the institutions that much of the work implicitly critiqued,” said Max Schumann, the Acting Executive Director and veteran of Printed Matter. “As one of the pioneering organizations in the field of artists’ books, Printed Matter has stood at the junction of the book as art-form, art-vehicle, art-concept and art-process throughout its 39 year history. The goal of this exhibition is to provide a space for the examination and celebration of this critical cultural activity.”

Printed Matter was founded in 1976 by Sol Lewitt and Lucy Lippard among others, and capitalized on the growing interest in publications made by leading contemporary artists, such as Vito Acconci, Kathy Acker, John Baldessari, Hanne Darboven, Alison Knowles, Louise Lawler, Sol LeWitt, Edward Ruscha, and Lawrence Weiner. Through decades of its own records and files, Learn to Read Art provides a visual account of the history of the store’s collaboration with artists as well as the contemporary art scene in which it engaged.

Learn to Read Art: A Surviving History of Printed Matter will be organized along a timeline of documents, ephemera, editions and publications, which will be presented alongside a chronologically arranged reading library of artists’ books from the corresponding decades, allowing for a hands-on, between-the-covers interaction with exhibition.

Publishing Residency
Complimenting the expansive visual installation will be a fully equipped onsite bookmaking studio where artist residents will produce new publications over the course of the exhibition. Artists Mary Ellen Carroll, Jesse Hlebo/Swill Children, Juliana Huxtable, Red76, Research and Destroy New York City and Josh Smith will work with the support of NYU studio assistants to produce editioned publications on a photocopy printer, a risograph printer, silkscreen, and letterpress.

Satellite Bookshop
A portion of the exhibition space will become a temporary Printed Matter bookstore, featuring a broad selection of contemporary artists’ books from the organization’s inventory. Publications will be available for sale, providing an important platform for the activation of these works through their physical dissemination. Books produced onsite by publishing residents will also be available within this space.

“Printed Matter remains unique in its ability to democratize the field of contemporary art. Where else in NYC does an artist book by Ed Ruscha sit next to a zine by a teenager from rural Ohio?” said Jonathan Berger, Director of the 80WSE Gallery. “Through offering a full history of how Printed Matter developed as the vital institution that it is, I believe that this exhibition has the potential to be an incredible resource for new generations of artists in search of new and different independent models, which enable new possibilities that push beyond the confines of the present.”

Learn to Read Art: A Surviving History of Printed Matter is curated by artist/curator Max Schumann, a veteran of Printed Matter, and artist/curator Jonathan Berger, Director of the 80WSE Gallery and Assistant Professor of Art and Arts Professions at the NYU Steinhardt School.

The title of the exhibition is taken from a text piece by conceptual artist Lawrence Weiner, who has a career-long artists’ book practice, and has had a relationship with Printed Matter since its founding. The exhibition runs throughFebruary 14, 2015.

To receive additional information about the exhibition, please write toNews@printedmatter.org.

RSVP to the opening reception on Facebook here.

 

Printed Matter, Inc.
Printed Matter, Inc. is an independent 501(c)3 non-profit organization founded in 1976 by artists and art workers with the mission to foster the appreciation, dissemination, and understanding of artists’ books and other artists’ publications.

www.nyartbookfair.com
www.laartbookfair.net
www.printedmatter.org

Printed Matter, Inc. has received support, in part, through grants from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, The Booth Ferris Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund (The Charles E. Culpeper Arts & Culture Grants), The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Gesso Foundation, Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York and the Fund for the City of New York, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Art Dealers of America Association, The Jerome Foundation, The Greenwich Collection Ltd., The Lily Auchincloss Foundation, The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, The Orphiflamme Foundation, The Harpo Foundation, The Leon Levy Foundation, The Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation, Furthermore Foundation, The Cowles Charitable Trust, The Foundation for Contemporary Arts, The Mondriaan Fund, The National Endowment for the Arts, The New York State Council on the Arts, The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, The Schoenstadt Family Foundation, The Jay DeFeo Trust, Clinton Hill/Allen Tran Foundation, Society of American Archivists, The Hyde and Watson Foundation, New York Council for the Humanities, Shapco, and individuals worldwide.

Printed Matter, Inc.
195 Tenth Avenue
New York, NY 10011
www.printedmatter.org

T: 212 925 0325
F: 212 925 0464

MICA Competitive Scholarships for Returning Undergraduate Students: Applications being accepted now until February 2, 2015

Each spring, MICA offers students the chance to compete for more than $600,000 in merit-based scholarships. Eligible students must be currently enrolled, full-time, degree-seeking undergraduates and must register full-time for the 2015–2016 academic year. All applicants must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher as of the Fall 2014 semester. Students receiving MICA tuition remission benefits are not eligible for competitive scholarships.

Funding for competitive scholarships comes from MICA and individual donors and organizations.

All awards will be applied as a credit to the recipients’ 2015–2016 account.

 

How to Apply:

  1. Create a Behance Project for jury review.

Your Behance project must:

  • Contain only your own original work
  • Not be restricted as “private” in Behance settings
  • Be kept available and unchanged on Behance through the end of the Spring semester

 

Your Project may contain any one of the following application options:

  1. Up to 10 digital images.

Each image must be:

  1. 300 dpi
  2. No larger than 7” on the longest side
  3. .jpeg or .gif formatted (.gif loop length must be 18 seconds or shorter)
  4. You may include image captions that describe the title, dimensions, and date of your work

 

  1. Up to 5 digital images and up to 1 minute 30 seconds of media.

Each image must be:

  1. 300 dpi
  2. No larger than 7” on the longest side
  3. .jpeg or .gif formatted (.gif loop length must be 18 seconds or shorter)
  4. You may include image captions that describe the title, dimensions, and date of your work

Each media file must be:

  1. Video, animation, audio, or documentation of time-based work
  2. .mp3, .mp4, or .mov format
  3. Files may contain one media work or several cut together into one file
  4. You may include a caption with the title and date of your work
  5. For video documentation of time-based art, performance, or installation, any sound must be part of the original work, not added for the purpose of the scholarship review. However, voice-over to assist in clarification or “to set the stage” is acceptable. It may not be used to describe meaning, technique, your process, interpretation, or intention.

 

  1. Up to 3 minutes of media.

Each media file must be:

  1. Video, animation, audio, or documentation of time-based work
  2. .mp3, .mp4, or .mov format
  3. Files may contain one media work or several cut together into one file
  4. You may include a caption with the title and date of your work
  5. For video documentation of time-based art, performance, or installation, any sound must be part of the original work, not added for the purpose of the scholarship review. However, voice-over to assist in clarification or “to set the stage” is acceptable. It may not be used to describe meaning, technique, your process, interpretation, or intention.

 

  1. Interactive work.
  2. Provide a link to a webpage with interactive work instead of a Behance project
  3. Juries will spend 3 minutes viewing/interacting with the work

 

  1. Written work.—Available to Art History majors only (no double majors)
  2. Provide a link to a Google Document of up to 2500 words in length instead of a Behance project
  3. Document’s Sharing Settings must be set to “Anyone with the link can view”
  4. May be one paper or several smaller works combined into one document
  5. Acceptable art historical writing may be (but not limited to): exhibitions reviews, research papers, essays, or formal analyses

 

Note: Collaborative work may be submitted, but the applicant must have written permission from the other collaborator(s) before applying.

 

  1. Apply online by visiting www.mica.edu/competitivescholarships between December 1st and 4pm on February 2nd, 2015.

Don’t wait until the last minute to apply!

 

Helpful Links:

 

Process Timeline:

  • Monday, December 1:  Application opens (www.mica.edu/competitivescholarships)
  • Thursday, December 11:  Informational Session takes place 7–8pm in Bunting Center room 110
  • Thursday, January 22:  Informational Session takes place 7–8pm in Leake Hall Auditorium
  • Monday, February 2: Applications Due before 4 pm sharp. No late applications will be accepted!
  • Mid-March 2015: Notification letters arrive to all applicants by mail

 

If you have any questions concerning the application requirements or process, please contact Alisha Green, Executive Assistant for Academic Services, at agreen@mica.edu or 410-225-4233.

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